Home > Uncategorized > A Federalist Article on the “Trans Juggernaut” Unwittingly Flags a Conundrum of Public School Choice

A Federalist Article on the “Trans Juggernaut” Unwittingly Flags a Conundrum of Public School Choice

August 18, 2017

Google’s daily Public Schools feed provides me with an opportunity to read articles from publications I would ordinarily not seek out on my own. A recent Federalist article, “Trans Juggernaut Wants Your Kids. Public Schools Are Just the Beginning” by Joy Pullman is a case in point… and it provides an insight for me on how libertarian conservatives face a dilemma when they seek market based solutions to public schools and complete freedom to pursue whatever they wish with no government interference.

Ms. Pullman’s premise is that there is an organized movement of transgender individuals who are actively and aggressively promoting their “agenda”. Here’s the nub of her argument:

As theologian N.T. Wright pointed out to the Times of London last week, “Nature…tends to strike back, with the likely victims in this case being vulnerable and impressionable youngsters who, as confused adults, will pay the price for their elders’ fashionable fantasies.”

This is likely why the transgender movement is targeting the young: They are vulnerable and impressionable, prepuberty pose better as either sex and therefore look less terrifying than adult transgenders, and once locked into the trans body morph will never truly be able to escape. Devastated people are prime candidates for exploitation by their pretend advocates. Also, locking in trans-policies now is a way to preclude debate before more extensive data and personal experience can fuel the inevitable backlash.

But Ms. Pullman’s example how the transgender movement is imposing its agenda on public education unwittingly underscores one of the major dilemmas of the “choice” movement. A parent in a public charter school who was dismayed at the treatment their transgender child was receiving sued the school to… in Ms. Pullman’s words…”accommodate their five-year-old son, whom they claim is transgender.” The result?

Parents began transferring their kindergarteners out of the child’s class when they came home saying things like, “Mom, I think you can choose if you want to be a boy or a girl,” according to interviews with The Daily Signal.

To one who has deep misgivings about charters and choice and who does not believe that schools should be subjected to the rules of the marketplace, I find this to be a delicious irony… and a perfect example of how choice advocates want to have things both ways. If a parent chooses to enroll in the charter school that accepts public funds raised by taxpayers they have to accept the rules that govern all public schools…. including rules that require accommodations for transgender children. And it seems to me that libertarian leaning readers of the Federalist would wholeheartedly support a parent’s right to claim their child is transgender. Otherwise the government would be imposing a requirement that overrules the parent’s freedom of choice.

It strikes me that the only way out of the woods on this issue is to require parents who want their children to attend schools who base their policies on anything other than public secular law to pay for their child’s education. Public funds and religious policies and regulations do not mix… as Saudi Arabia’s funding of madrases illustrates.

Finally, those parents who transferred their child out of the class of their classmate whose parents “claimed is transgender” might use their child’s questioning of their gender as a teachable moment… an opportunity to explain the importance of tolerance and inclusivity and an opportunity to share their understandings of gender. Like it or not, in this day of free and open speech, YouTube access, and conversations on playgrounds, some news report some time during a child’s upbringing is going to compel a child to raise the question the kindergartners raised when their classmate announced he was transgender.

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