Home > Uncategorized > Revisiting Predictions on President Trump’s Impact on Public Education II: Bullying

Revisiting Predictions on President Trump’s Impact on Public Education II: Bullying

A year ago I wrote several posts on Donald Trump’s looming presidency and where I him leading us. For the final installment on these predictions I am going to revisit predictions I offered on bullying in 2016.

Like many who did not support Mr. Trump, I was appalled at his lack of civility and bullying tactics throughout his campaign. In one blog post I wrote about a spike in bullying behavior in schools, how Mr. Trump’s conduct promoted that kind of behavior, and how his behavior was far from the kind witnessed by other GOP Presidents:

While I did not support the positions of President Reagan or either President Bush I DID find them to be statesmanlike. They all urged us to be civil towards each other and to embrace our differences of opinion. While some of their election tactics were smarmy (e.g. the Willie Horton ad) their conduct and use of language was always exemplary. But now we have elected a man who uses 140 characters to distill his “thinking” and who is not at all hesitant to use racist, sexist, and xenophobic slurs. Worse, his comments tend to support bullying tactics in our relationships with other countries and within our own country. He has communicated to those students who share his beliefs and bullying tendencies that those beliefs and behaviors are not only acceptable, but those who push back against them are “soft” and trying to enforce “politically correct” thinking.

Alas, there is evidence that many students have adopted his methods of dealing with “others”. The results of a NYC survey administered to public school students provides evidence:

In 2016, 51% of students said kid bullied each other at school “because of their race or ethnicity.”

On a similar question in 2017, 65% of students said kids bullied each other at school over “race, religion, ethnicity, national origin, or citizenship/immigration status.”

Likewise, in 2016, 55% of students said kids bullied each other at school because of differences “like national origin, citizenship/immigration status, religion, disability, or weight.”

On a similar question in 2017, 73% of students said kids bullied each other at school because of differences “like disability, or weight.”

And in 2016, 46% of students said that kids at their school “harass, bully, or intimidate each other because of their gender, gender identity, gender expression, or sexual orientation.”

That question was unchanged for 2016, when 59% of students reported gender-based bullying at their schools.

The “reformers” in NYC blamed this on Mayor diBlasio’s refusal to open more charter schools… and while the NYDaily News did not assign responsibility to any one factor, it seems clear to me that our President who promotes misogyny, xenophobia, racism, and the taunting of handicapped individuals might bear some responsibility.

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