Home > Uncategorized > VP Biden’s Domestic Advisor Advocates for Foster Children… But in Doing So Undercuts Real Problem and Reinforces Private Sector “Power”

VP Biden’s Domestic Advisor Advocates for Foster Children… But in Doing So Undercuts Real Problem and Reinforces Private Sector “Power”

December 31, 2017

Yesterday’s NYTimes  op ed piece featured an by former VP Biden’s Domestic Advisor Sherry Lachman that drew attention to a devastating consequence of the opioid epidemic: an increase in the number of foster children. The article offers statistics like these on the impact of opioids on foster care and the impact of foster care on the later lives of children:

As more Americans struggle with opioid addiction and find themselves unable to perform their duties as parents, children are pouring into state and county foster care systems. In Montana, the number of children in foster care has doubled since 2010. In Georgia, it has increased by 80 percent, and in West Virginia, by 45 percent. Altogether, nearly 440,000 kids are spending this holiday season in foster care, compared with 400,000 in 2011..

…Children who have been in foster care are five times more likely to abuse drugs. As many as 70 percent of youths in the juvenile justice system have spent time in the child welfare system. One-third of homeless young adults were previously in foster care. Black children are twice as likely as white children to wind up in foster care and face its devastating effects, a symptom of our country’s disparate treatment of black and white families who experience similar challenges.

The article offers heart wrenching examples of how foster children are shuttled from home to home or, even worse, into warehouse-like dwellings full of other foster children. Near the end of the article, Ms. Lachman offers some ideas on how best to fix the problem that this increase in foster care is creating:

Children in foster care desperately need their help. We cannot put the entire burden of fixing the system on the backs of overworked, underpaid social workers. Our government must treat the child welfare crisis like the emergency it is and respond with more funding and better policies. We need more philanthropists, advocates and celebrities to champion this cause and more families to open their homes and hearts.

We particularly need companies and professionals with private-sector expertise to partner with child welfare agencies and bring the system into the 21st century. Marketing experts can help recruit foster parents and spread the word about the 100,000 foster children who are available for adoption. Customer service specialists and user-centered designers can help children and families better navigate the system. Data scientists can use analytics to predict and prevent child abuse and reduce the number of kids who enter the system in the first place.

Had Ms. Lachman elaborated on the need for more funding and better policies, she would have my wholehearted support. But her call for companies and professionals with private-sector expertise and her notion that …Data scientists can use analytics to predict and prevent child abuse and reduce the number of kids who enter the system in the first place are completely wrongheaded.

I am certain the “overworked, underpaid social workers” posses the kinds of “private-sector expertise” she values, but given their hectic schedules and the emotionally drain that comes from overwork and the nature of their assignments they are unable to apply those skills because they are doing everything humanly possible to meet the demands of their job. As one who worked for decades as a public school administrator I know how overwork and relatively low compensation can debilitate and demoralize individuals who possess the same skill sets as individuals who work in the private sector. Instead of calling in consultants who work in the private sector, it would be far better to provide more jobs in the public sector see that public sector employees can unleash their own talents for recruitment, marketing, and means for navigating the system. 

Similarly, if social work agencies were staffed adequately they would not need data scientists to “predict and prevent child abuse”. The factors that lead to opioid abuse are known to anyone who examines our economic and judicial system. Our current economy provides only dead-end jobs for those lacking a post-secondary degree and virtually no jobs whatsoever for those who have been convicted of crimes of any kind. If we had better policies for education, if we insisted that the minimum wage was a living wage, if we stopped imprisoning people for being unable to pay fines for petty violations we just might reduce the number of our citizens who turn to opioids out of despair and the number of citizens who sell opioids in order to make ends meet.

Ms. Lachman’s notion that private sector expertise and technology will save the day is classic neoliberal thinking. It endorses the idea that “government can’t solve problems” and “private-sector expertise” can. It sees technology as the deus ex machina that will free us from the need for more public sector employees and the higher taxes that would result from hiring more people.

This just in: private sector expertise and technology will not end opioid addiction and the collateral damage it brings. Economic and social injustice creates the environment that leads to addiction…. and those problems can be solved by more funding and better policies. Those problems can be solved by government.

 

 

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