Home > Uncategorized > If You “Run-Schools-Like-a-Business” Privatization is the Ultimate Result… and Democracy Loses Out

If You “Run-Schools-Like-a-Business” Privatization is the Ultimate Result… and Democracy Loses Out

August 18, 2018

In one of her posts yesterday, Diane Ravitch bemoaned the fact that the Democrats For Education Reform (DFER) was in fact comprised of hedge funders who were Republicans as well as Democrats. After reading her critique of DFER, it struck me that she missed DFER’s over-arching message, which ISN’T that schools should be privatized: it’s that schools should operate like a business.

As a retired school superintendent I can attest to the fact that many newly elected school board members and in some instances a majority of taxpayers share this sentiment. On most school boards the experienced school board members would patiently explain to their newly elected “run-schools-like-business” colleagues that public schools, unlike businesses, are operated democratically and decisions that a school board makes need to be done openly and democratically. And unlike a business, which can determine their “success” based on the bottom line, schools lack a clear metric for success.

This is why the “run-schools-like-a-business” reformers love standardized tests: test scores provide them with a seemingly precise metric that serves as a proxy for “profit”. In this way the “run-schools-like-a-business” crowd can make a cold determination on which schools are “successful” and which are “failing”. Many Democrats, wanting to show that they can run government with the same kind of cold efficiency as CEOs can run a corporation, buy into the “run-schools-like-a-business” ethos. That’s why there is bi-partisan support for test-driven “reforms” like NCLB and why a “liberal president” spent billions on testing and test-based “merit pay” instead of on programs that would help children or help states equalize funding disparities.

DFER is very comfortable with privatization because that is the ultimate consequence of “running-schools-like-a-business”… and until voters realize that businesses are not democratic we may see our all our public services operated by the private sector. And instead of getting a human voice on the phone when your child encounters a problem in school, expect to get a menu urging you to go to a web page and engage in a chat with someone who will likely be housed offshore following a prescribed problem solving algorithm.

 

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